Build Business 2008: Lead Tracking and Client Relationship Management – Group 2

Group 2 Members:

Tim Klabunde – William H. Gordon Associates – Moderator

Carrie Mandelin, CPSM – Mortenson Construction

Debbie Gilbert, CPSM – McCulloch England Associates Architects

Emily Crandall, CPSM – Horizon Engineering

Kelly Ryan, CPSM – Architects Mosher Drew Watson Ferguson

Lori Slivensky, CPSM – Swinerton Builders

Matt deWit, CPSM – Geosyntec Consultants

Megan Muter, CPSM – HDR Architecture

Michelle Yates, CPSM – Lawrence Group

Paula Harris, CPSM – Barge Waggoner Sumner & Cannon

Robin Tsuchida, AIA, LEED AP, DBIA, CPSM – SUNDT

Sara Paul, LEED AP, CPSM – ARUP

Sheila Gonzales, CPSM – Provost & Pritchard Engineering Group

Stacy Robben, LEED AP, CPSM – HOK

Terry Ann Clifford, CPSM – Dibble Engineering

Tracy Sagehorn, CPSM – ColeJenest & Stone

 

Session Overview:

Regularly turning leads into work is one of the most important actions that a company takes to solidify its future workloads and establish its growth path. Discussions centered on best practices and lessons learned on managing the lead tracking and relationship process through client relationship management systems.  Each of the three groups (Posted separately here) developed a list of the ‘Top 10 Keys to Managing Leads.”  That list for this group is provided below:

 

Group 2: Top 10 Keys to Managing Leads

  1. Build an accountability system linked to your CRM
  2. Control and limit access to the system to preserve data integrity
  3. Establish specific standards on data entry and enforce them
  4. Identify ownership of not just the system, but also the fields in the system. What fields are Marketing, Accounting, and HR accountable for?
  5. When starting a new client relationship tracking system make marketing department responsible for the initial data entry and then transition the responsibility to the users of that data.
  6. Develop an effective “carrot” to motivate employees to use the system such as goals that are linked to the data drawn from the system.
  7. Ensure that project closeout forms are completed prior to accounting closing the job so that the database is always up to date.
  8. Clean up data before you download it into a new system
  9. “Draw a line in the sand” when starting a new lead tracking system. Do not complete old data entry unless it is required. This will significantly lower starting costs and allow for a focus on new information.
  10. Bring marketing and accounting together on a regular basis to facilitate communication regarding the shared systems.
  11. BONUS: Start with your end goals/objectives in mind

Build Business 2008: Lead Tracking and Client Relationship Management – Group 1

Group 1 Members:

Tim Klabunde – William H. Gordon Associates – Moderator

Dale A. Walker, CPSM – Francis Cauffman

Danna Olivo, CPSM – Turner Construction

Harry Lawrence, CPSM – RGA Environmental

Julia Oseland, CPSM – Harris & Associates

Lisa Thut, CPSM – Furgo Onshore Geotechnics

Lynn DiPlacito, CPSM – GossenLivingston

Shannon Bond, CPSM – PSOMAS

Shivina Waterman, CPSM – Winter Construction

Tracy Allen, CPSM – SANDIS

 

Session Overview:

Regularly turning leads into work is one of the most important actions that a company takes to solidify its future workloads and establish its growth path. Discussions centered on best practices and lessons learned on managing the lead tracking and relationship process through client relationship management systems.  Each of the three groups (Posted separately here) developed a list of the ‘Top 10 Keys to Managing Leads.”  That list for this group is provided below:

Group 1: Top 10 Keys to Managing Leads

  1. When developing a CRM you need to identify your end product first, and then base the development of your system on achieving that end result.
  2. No one system is the right solution for every company. Identify your needs and develop a system that fits your requirements and company culture.
  3. All user groups need to be involved in the discussions about and selection of a new CRM system.
  4. Clearly define the terms you use in a database. For example: be certain everyone agrees what a ‘lead’ is versus a ‘prospect.’
  5. Develop realistic expectations about the system before it is implemented. This will ensure managers and users understand the limitations and opportunities of the system.
  6. Look at your existing systems to develop what you need. What tools are you missing today that would help your staff be more successful?
  7. Discuss who will maintain control of the system before you implement it.
  8. Focus on getting buy-in prior to purchasing your system.
  9. Your system needs to track relationships for followed up and provide a reminder when the follow-up needs to occur.
  10. “Draw a line in the sand” when starting a new lead tracking system. Do not complete old data entry unless it is required. This will significantly lower starting costs and allow for a focus on new information.